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by Jessica Taylor 139 days ago | link | parent

For another thing, consider questions such as, why intelligent agents outcompete instinct-based agents, and why general intelligence (i.e. Bayes optimality or at least some notion of good performance w.r.t. a prior that is “universal” or “nearly universal” in some sense) can be developed by evolution in a rather restricted environment. These questions seem much easier to answer if intelligence has some frequentist property (i.e. it is in some sense effective in all or most environments) compared to, if intelligence has only purely Bayesian properties (i.e. it is only good on average w.r.t. some very broad ensemble of environments).

I don’t understand why you think this. Suppose there is some simple “naturalized AIXI”-ish thing that is parameterized on a prior, and there exists a simple prior for which an animal running this algorithm with this prior does pretty well in our world. Then evolution may produce an animal running something like naturalized AIXI with this prior. But naturalized AIXI is only good on average rather than guaranteeing effectiveness in almost all environments.



by Vadim Kosoy 138 days ago | link

My intuition is that it must not be just a coincidence that the agent happens to works well in our world, otherwise your formalism doesn’t capture the concept of intelligence in full. For example, we are worried that a UFAI would be very likely to kill us in this particular universe, not just in some counterfactual universes. Moreover, Bayesian agents with simple priors often do very poorly in particular worlds, because of what I call “Bayesian paranoia”. That is, if your agent thinks that lifting its left arm will plausibly send it to hell (a rather simple hypothesis), it will never lift its left arm and learn otherwise.

In fact, I suspect that a certain degree of “optimism” is inherent in our intuitive notion of rationality, and it also has a good track record. For example, when scientists did early experiments with electricity, or magnetism, or chemical reactions, their understanding of physics at the time was arguably insufficient to know this will not destroy the world. However, there were few other ways to go forward. AFAIK the first time anyone seriously worried about a physics experiment was the RHIC (unless you also count the Manhattan project, when Edward Teller suggested the atom bomb might create a self-sustaining nuclear fusion reaction that will envelope the entire atmosphere). These latter concerns were only raised because we already knew enough to point at specific dangers. Of course this doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be worried about X-risks! But I think that some form of a priori optimism is plausibly correct, in some philosophical sense. (There was also some thinking in that direction by Sunehag and Hutter although I’m not sold on the particular formalism they consider).

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by Jessica Taylor 137 days ago | link

I think I understand your point better now. It isn’t a coincidence that an agent produced by evolution has a good prior for our world (because evolution tries many priors, and there are lots of simple priors to try). But the fact that there exists a simple prior that does well in our universe is a fact that needs an explanation. It can’t be proven from Bayesianism; the closest thing to a proof of this form is that computationally unbounded agents can just be born with knowledge of physics if physics is sufficiently simple, but there is no similar argument for computationally bounded agents.

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